Why gospel singer Size 8 did not attend her mum’s burial


Size 8 has no regrets for crossing over from the secular camp to the gospel world ...
Size 8 has no regrets for crossing over from the secular camp to the gospel world PHOTO/COURTESY

Gospel singer Linet Munyali, better known by her stage name, Size 8 is back to the limelight after a two-month hiatus – thanks to her new status as a mother to adorable baby, Ladasha Wambui.

The singer who has no regrets for crossing over from the secular camp to the gospel world divulged exclusively to Citizen Television on Friday, January 29, about her motherhood experience – her lows and highs.

Below is the transcript of the One on One interview the Mateke star had with Citizen TV’s Lillian Muli.

About pregnancy

“My pregnancy was horrible. I was constantly in and out of hospital. I gave birth to the baby through cesarean section. She’d arrived four weeks earlier than expected. It was a lot of drama, but when I held her in my arms, I forgot everything!

She says the feeling is priceless!

“That’s why I always post on my Instagram when you happen to fall pregnant, don’t abort; you might conceive for the wrong man, but know that there are many women out there wishing they’d be in your position. I personally wouldn’t want to imagine life without Ladasha.”

Size 8 had her share of struggles with the pregnancy.

“My baby was underweight; she was 1.9kgs. I remember being given the baby, wondering what to do; first she was not full term, second she was 1.9kgs, and when I left the hospital, she was 1.7kgs; when I got home, there was a blackout and the generator wasn’t working; I was told the baby had to be kept warm…it was terrible; but now (two months later) she is 4kgs!” she says triumphantly.

Being a first-time mother, does she fear breastfeeding her baby like some women do?

“I wonder what madness it is (that young women don’t want to breastfeed)! That is being very selfish; the little education I have about breast milk is that it boosts the baby’s immune system and it is easy for a newborn to digest. It is also through breastfeeding you bond with your baby.”

Despite this remarkable knowledge, Size 8 could only wish to practice what she believes in.

“At that time (After giving birth) I did not have enough baby milk; my mum had just passed on, and a lot of stress about the baby weighed me down. However, now I am happy she is okay.”

Her message to young women who are scared of motherhood…

“What I’ll tell mothers is if managed to go through (the traumatizing experience) of giving birth, losing my mum the following day and the baby being underweight; but still managed to go home with her, and now she is 4kgs, then you can also do it. God gives you grace.”

On striking a balance between her daughter and husband…

“DJ Mo was there for me; it was the time I had lost my parent, and I was on a week-long depression. However when I came out of it, I got back to reality that I needed to balance. I asked God to give me strength, grace and wisdom to balance between the two people; somehow I found a way. Furthermore, my husband is very supportive.”

About losing her mother a day after giving birth

“To some point I asked God: ‘What have I done wrong?’ It was a whole lot of drama; I wanted to give birth normally, but I was told I could only do so through CS… Immediately after getting through all that, I was told my mum had died. I couldn’t mourn my mum, I couldn’t be happy for my baby – let me just be honest. I went blank because if I mourned my mum that meant I wasn’t happy for my baby and if I was happy for my baby that meant I did not mourn my mum. I could not even function!

It is this dilemma which made Size 8 have emotional crisis.

“I remember one day while I was in hospital I broke down, the whole ward came to where I was – I was shouting and screaming. I called out Jesus, asking: ‘What was going on?’”

“But I later said God was molding me for more ministry; now I can talk to a woman who has gone through some of these things (challenges).

Did she attend her mum’s burial in Uganda?

“I did not go. The Karen Hospital psychologist talked to me and asked me to go see my mum; at that time I had not fully healed from the afterbirth pains. But I went to church and saw her for five minutes – I hadn’t seen her after she died. Unfortunately I could not travel because it was recommended I shouldn’t. The baby too at that time needed me. Everyone traveled to Uganda, and I was left alone. The whole family wanted to bury my mum. I shed endless tears. It was terrible! I came out of it, and I am now much stronger!”

What has the whole experience taught her?

“Appreciate your loved ones; you never know. Even if you quarrel with your mum, please pick the phone up and call her; life is like a flower. Secondly, we need God; you cannot survive without Him; I learnt it is only Him who brought me out of the whole situation.”

About the new black hair look…

“I ended up with black hair because my salonist went to Congo and then I had nobody to come home and make my hair. I could not leave the house. The person who agreed to come plait my hair at home could not get my trademark red hair, and so she just came with the black weave. I love the black anyway.”

Career plans

“I have to go back to music, it’s in my DNA; I am also venturing into business and I have a Daycare in Mukondo Court, Buruburu Phase I, Nairobi.

Being a celebrity couple…

Size 8 is married to DJ Mo. Expectedly; the two are bound to encounter challenges that come with their celebrity status. But, how does the couple handle the pressure?

“Gossipers, stalkers will always be there. But when we got married we knew in the house it is Samuel Muaraya and Linet Munyali – there’s no DJ Mo, there’s no Size 8. We leave the celebrity status at the door once we arrive at home. (We perform the) normal husband and wife duties; (we are just) in a normal marriage.”

Watch below the One on One interview with Size 8:

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Brian Okoth
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