Gov’t to bring back ‘Michuki Rules’ to curb road carnage


The wrecakge of the matatu in the Kimende accident. Photo/GIKUNGA KARIUKI
The wreckage of the matatu in Kimende. Photo/FILE

In Summary

  • In a statement to newsroom signed by Cabinet Secretaries James Macharia (Transport, Infrastructure) and Dr. Fred Matiang’i (Interior), they attributed the high road accidents to "lack of observance of the laws governing traffic management."
  • Matiang'i and Macharia have given a grace period of two weeks for all stakeholders to comply with the new rules.
  • Former Transport Minister John Michuki introduced the tough laws back in 2003 and while he faced resistance from the industry players, he did not relent and had the public backing him.

The runaway road carnage being witnessed in the country has forced the government to bring back the “Michuki rules” which helped restore sanity on Kenyan roads.

In a joint press statement, Cabinet Secretaries James Macharia (Transport, Infrastructure) and Dr. Fred Matiang’i (Interior), attributed the high road accidents to “lack of observance of the laws governing traffic management.”

Matiang’i and Macharia have given a grace period of two weeks for all stakeholders to comply with the new rules.

“Therefore, effective Monday, 12th November 2018, any PSV vehicle, drivers, SACCOs/Transport companies, passengers and other relevant parties that fail to comply with the provisions of the NTSA Act and the Traffic Act will be firmly dealt with in accordance with the law,” reads the statement.

Former Transport Minister John Michuki introduced the tough laws back in 2003 and while he faced resistance from the industry players, he did not relent and had the public backing him.

The laws were effective in taming rogue drivers and saw the number of accident deaths reduce significantly.

However, his successors were not keen on carrying through the legacy and the country slid back to the rogue days.

The statement said; All public service vehicles (PSV) must be fitted with:-

(i) Speed limiters/governors.

(ii) Safety belts (seat belts).

(iii) Yellow continuous line.

At the same time, all PSV drivers and conductors are required to:-

(i) Wear uniforms and PSV badges as prescribed by law.

(ii) Prominently display their photos as prescribed by law.

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Story By Benjamin Muriuki
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