KCAA denies reports that two planes nearly collided in Kenyan airspace


Kenya Civil Aviation Authority
Kenya Civil Aviation Authority

In Summary

  • In a statement to newsrooms, the authority has termed the article as misleading, adding that it does not conform to records available to them based on surveillance replays.
  • KCAA further slammed reports in the said article linking the alleged near-collision to striking Air Traffic Controllers in Ethiopia saying none of the aircraft involved originated from the Addis Ababa airspace.
  • KCAA also distanced itself from sections of the newspaper article which stated that the alleged incident had put the Ethiopian Civil Aviation Authority (ECAA) on the warpath with Kenya Air Traffic Controllers.

The Kenya Civil Aviation Authority (KCAA) has refuted reports published in a local daily that two passenger planes were involved in a near-collision in Naivasha.

According to the said article published in The East African, the two planes missed each other by a whisker in the Kenyan airspace “when the pilot of one of the planes — upon receiving a warning from the inflight traffic collision system — made a sudden climb to avoid the oncoming flight.”

In a statement to newsrooms, the authority has termed the article as misleading, adding that it does not conform to records available to them based on surveillance replays.

KCAA further slammed reports in the said article linking the alleged near-collision to striking Air Traffic Controllers in Ethiopia saying none of the aircraft involved originated from the Addis Ababa airspace.

“The said aircraft were in communication with Nairobi on 29th August 2018 and they were maintaining correct flight levels. The Controller issued instructions to separate the aircraft before the minimum allowable distance of 10NM was bridged, details of which are available in our records,” says KCAA in the statement signed by Director General Gilbert Kibe.

“The objective of Air Traffic Control (ATC) among others is to avoid collision and the Air Traffic Control Officer (ATCO) in Kenya did their work as expected.”

According to the authority, none of the pilots have filed an incident report as would have been the case “if indeed the pilot took the initiative on his own without getting the instructions from ATC.”

“The two aircraft are also well fitted with Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) that would issue automatic instructions requiring each of the aircraft to take a specific action to avoid collision,” adds the statement.

KCAA also distanced itself from sections of the newspaper article which stated that the alleged incident had put the Ethiopian Civil Aviation Authority (ECAA) on the warpath with Kenya Air Traffic Controllers.

“The two Civil Aviation Authorities are constantly in communication and no official correspondence from Ethiopia has been received expressing displeasure with Kenya Air Traffic Controllers,” reads the statement.

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