Kilifi men ‘cannot buy sanitary towels’


Vaginal estrogen linked to improved sexual health for some women

In Summary

  • Conversations of sexual nature are frowned upon which means that most of what the girls learn are from their peers in school or in the community.
  • Most girls between 14 and 29 years in Kilifi are young mothers.
  • The Global Menstruation Hygiene Management Day was marked on May 28.

By Abchun Abdi

Majority of Kilifi county men cannot buy sanitary towels or talk about sexual reproductive health with their adolescent girls, a report has revealed.

The men believe that it is not a man’s duty to talk about such topics with their daughters and cite culture as the reason why.

This emerged during a dialogue meeting between non profits advocating for change of attitude on the girl child.

The session that was led by Deutsche Stifuny Weld Belvockerung (DSW) revealed that ancient beliefs are linked to the rising cases of teenage pregnancy.

The meeting was further told that the number of female school dropouts is rising by the day as is cases of gender-based violence.

Conversations of sexual nature are frowned upon which means that most of what the girls learn are from their peers in school or in the community.

Witness Tuma, Chairlady of Kilifi County Maendeleo ya Wanawake Organization (MYWO) expressed her dismay saying it is sad that most girls between 14 and 29 years in Kilifi are young mothers.

She was speaking during the event that marked the Global Menstruation Hygiene Management Day at Mnarani Club.

According to her,  if the problem is not addressed, the county may not have women leaders in future as majority of them end up not completing their education.

She added that there are many non profits working to provide of sanitary towels and initiate sex education but there is very little impact on the ground.

Apparently, the girls are forced to share what they get with their mothers.

Tuma however said that they intend to roll up a campaign that will ensure men are involved in their daughter’s lives.

Halima Ali, the Young Adolescent Program coordinator funded by DSW, added that there is need to break the silence.

“The county government needs to intervene and help the girl child to reduce the rising cases of teenage pregnancies,” she said.

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