Orders stopping fresh gov’t vetting to remain in force, court rules


Orders stopping fresh gov't vetting to remain in force, court rules
Judge Onesmus Makau during a case on the planned vetting of all procurement and accounting officers. PHOTO| DZUYA WALTER

In Summary

  • In an application by the Solicitor General, Kennedy Ogeto, the government argues that the orders issued on Wednesday, June 6 should be set aside as they could cripple the fight against corruption.
  • During the hearing of the application by the government, Justice Makau was told that as of Friday 5pm, 458 public officers had voluntarily submitted their information required to the office of the president.
  • The court was told that everybody will be allowed time to give out the required information and that no one will be victimized.

Orders stopping a plan by the government to vet afresh all procurement and accounting officers will remain in force until Wednesday, June 13 when the court is set to rule on the matter.

In an application by the Solicitor General, Kennedy Ogeto, the government argues that the orders issued on Wednesday, June 6 should be set aside as they could cripple the fight against corruption.

“I will render my decision on 13th July, orders to remain inforce,”said Justice Onesmus Makau.

During the hearing of the application by the government, Justice Makau was told that as of Friday 5pm, 458 public officers had voluntarily submitted their information required to the office of the president.

The court was told that everybody will be allowed time to give out the required information and that no one will be victimized.

“According to the government, every officer will be given the opportunity to submit the information within reasonable time, the exercise in not meant to be punitive,” said Ogeto, adding that the exercise would be done within the Constitution.

Activist Okiya Omtata opposed the government application saying there was no public participation in the enactment of the decision to suspend the officers ahead of the fresh vetting.

“It is a fishing expedition, and is not provided for in the law,” said Omtatah.

According to Omtatah, the directive constitutes a gross attack on Article 25(c) of the Constitution which declares that the rights to a fair trial may not be limited.

He argues that the blanket disciplinary measure is being imposed on a class of people without holding each one accountable for specific claims as an individual, and without consideration for its impact on the general population and the public service.

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Story By Dzuya Walter
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