‘The Profiteers’: Kenyans to protest alleged South Sudan looting


'The Profiteers': Kenyans to protest alleged South Sudan looting

In Summary

  • This protest comes after a three-part documentary series produced by John Allan Namu of ‘Africa Uncensored’ titled ‘The Profiteers.’
  • The main aim of the protest is to request the Kenyan government to freeze the assets of said South Sudan leaders and to sanction Kenyan banks facilitating the alleged looting of the funds.
  • The protest has been organized by Kenyan activists led by Boniface Mwangi and in solidarity with South Sudan citizens living in Kenya.

A section of Kenyan citizens have organized a peaceful protest against alleged looting of funds in conflict-prone South Sudan by prominent leaders and politicians.

This comes after a three-part documentary series produced by John Allan Namu of ‘Africa Uncensored’ titled ‘The Profiteers.’

The main aim of the protest, led by activist Boniface Mwangi and organized in solidarity with South Sudan citizens living in Kenya, is to request the Kenyan government to freeze the assets of certain South Sudan leaders and to sanction Kenyan banks facilitating the alleged looting of the funds.

The South Sudanese citizens and their Kenyan counterparts will take to the streets on Thursday October 11, 2018 and will march to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs where they will deliver a letter to CS Monica Juma protesting the alleged involvement of Kenyan banks in the corruption and looting of South Sudan.

The organizers insist that their protest is non-political and non-partisan, further calling on the police to escort them during their rally.

“We shall assemble at Freedom Corner, 9am, 11th October and proceed via Kenyatta Avenue, Moi Avenue and then Harambee Avenue,” reads a letter to Central Police Station OCS signed by activist Boniface Mwangi and dated October 9, 2018.

“We look forward to being provided police escort for this peaceful march led by free citizens of this great country.”

‘The Profiteers,’ a documentary by Mr. Namu, an award-winning investigative journalist, was supposed to be aired by a local media house but was later dropped.

In a thread via his Twitter handle on Thursday, Mr. Namu stated that the editors of the said media house “were largely happy with the story, but wanted to remove certain parts of it as they sought comment from an adversely mentioned person. We disagreed, given that we had already sought fair comment from this person.”

The former Standard Media Group journalist then went ahead to upload the three-part documentary on social media platforms of ‘Africa Uncensored,’ and has since sparked a conversation in the country.

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Story By Ruth Leonorah
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